Skip to main content

About your Search

20110301
20110331
STATION
CNN 26
CSPAN 12
WHUT (Howard University Television) 5
KQED (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
WETA 2
CSPAN2 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 52
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
to building more nuclear power plants in the u.s. that is up from last year. >>> and now, it is just about that time to head it to the man, the birthday man today, wolf blitzer in "the situation room." wolf, to you. >>> thanks very much, brooke. happening now, two u.s. air force crew members make it out of a fighter jet crash in libya alive. we are taking you to the crash site and telling you how libyan rebels help keep one of them safe. >>> also, president obama is facing growing anger for ordering air strikes in libya without the approval of congress. now, one fellow democrat, even talking about possible impeachment. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15
at the wreckage of a u.s. f-15 that crashed today in rebel-held eastern libya, for reasons the u.s. military says were mechanical, not hostile. i will say that again for you. the u.s. says the plane had equipment problems and was not shot down. the two-man crew jekted and the pilot was recovered quickly. the weapons officer was found by rebels and americans reached him. neither badly hurt. >>> back in tripoli, reporters saw the results of a missile landing on a port. >>> we also have remarkable pictures from misrata, a city down the coast that gadhafi forces have bombarded for days. this is amateur video uploaded to youtube yesterday. now, we can't confirm when or where it was shot, but we do know misrata's main hospital reports 77 deaths since sunday. the u.n.-approved campaign to protect libyan civilians began saturday and it's still not clear who will actually end up in charge. arab states don't want to work for nato and u.s. has other campaigns to worry about. nato says it will enforce a libyan arms embarge go the in meantime. let's bring in diana magnay, she's on the "uss keer sauj." nic rep
, be careful over there. we'll stay in close touch. thank you. >>> u.s. officials say the defection shun of libya's foreign minister shows pressure is having an effect. moussa koussa led to london yesterday. hes the highest ranks official to break with the regime. he once serve as the intelligence chief, and has secrets to tell. the british prime minister says there's no deal of any kind to give moussa koussa immunity. joining us from tripoli, nic robertson. nic, you're getting some reaction from the libyan government on the defection shun of the foreign minister moussa koussa. >> reporter: we haven't had a reaction from the top, gu the government is saying they allowed him to deeffect, because of health reasons. they said he had a heart condition, but it's very clear from the fact that it took them limb 24 hours to respond to the defection that they didn't know it was coming. the government's trying to put the best face on it that they can, but it rings hollow. moussa koussa tricked this government, tricked the leadership and has left the country and left them hanging, wolf. >> how sign
to rain down. aircraft like this u.s. marine corps harrier jet have flown more than 212 missions so far against the libyan forces. ships in the mediterranean has launched more than 160 tomahawk cruise missiles. in the daylight the damage is becoming clear. this is what is left of several large rocket launchers, trucks and also other military hardware in tripoli's port area. far to the east, a u.s. fighter plane crashed due to mechanical problems. that happened near the opposition strong hold of bengahzi. the two-man crew parachuted from the doomed aircraft. u.s. marines managed to extract crewmen, one was picked up by rebels and taken to a luxury hotel suite. he's back in american hands. two days after the coalition missile slammed into his tripoli compound, a defined moammar gadhafi has been addressing supporters. he urged muslims worldwide to join the battle against what he calls blatant aggression. >> translator: we will be victorious in this fight. we will not give up. they will not penalize us. we are making fun of their rockets. the libyans are laughing at these rockets. we will d
problems. rebels rescued the weapons officer and turned him over to the united states. now, a u.s. team also picked up the pilot. he is now aboard the uss kearsergeant in the mediterranean. we'll have a live report shortly. >>> moammar gadhafi's ground forces are coming down hard on misrata right now. this amateur video appears to show a mortar shell that is landing near civilians. an opposition spokesman tells cnn the city will fall within hours unless the coalition helps. >> the carnage is too much to bear. this is the fifth day of shelling and destruction and carnage. we already have 77 deaths and we have a countless number of injuries and almost the whole center of the city now is unsafe because of snipers. we haven't seen international strikes since the first day of strikes and we are in urgent need of help quarterback otherwise misrata will be overrun tonight. >> before and after satellite photoses confirm that a mosque in zawiya will be destroyed. the mosque served as a command center for the resistance during the time they controlled zahyiya. >>> a spoke woman says one of three
can call the obama doctrine, when to deploy u.s. military forces around the world. he laid out the case when it's in the united states interest to use military force, when it's in the united states interest not to use military force, and this is the example that he gave, this is going to be the precedent, what the united states has done now in libya, presumably given the explosion of unrest that's happening right now throughout north africa and the middle east, if there are similar circumstances that develop in other countries, whether in syria, or yemen and bahrain, and the potential of mass slaughter of civilians is there, the pressure will be on this president to go ahead and authorize what the president authorized in libya. and the greatest potential for the u.s., if there's a revolution, and if there's serious unrest in iran and the people are standing up against mahmoud ahmadinejad and the i ayatollahs take similar action as far as iran is concerned. i think we can call this the obama doctrine. >> and he also made it clear what the limits of this mission is as he sees it
. >>> in chile, president obama tried to clarify. >> it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. >> senators on both sides of the aisle are concerned about the end game. >> if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. >> we do not have a clear diplomatic policy or a clear statement of foreign policy that is accompanying this military operation. >> there is a growing rift in the coalition over who should be in control. >> no apparent cooperation. some people want to turn it over to nato, the maiamericans and t brits. >> french president ruffled feathers by announcing publicly that french fighters were in the air before his international counterparts were briefed. whoever is in control, arizona republican senator john mccain says, there is only one way to end it. >> a stalemate is a very, very badout come. american policy is that gadhafi must go. >>> a naval facility was hit overnight east of tripoli. robert gates is in moscow. gates says gadhafi is misleading the russia
, briefing them to a conference call about the u.s. nato's agreement to take charge of the no-fly zone. over at the pentagon, a top adral haa story that may indicate colonel gadhafi is getting desperate. >> we received reports today that he has taken to armying what he calls volunteers to fight opposition. i'm not sure whether they truly are volunteers or not and i of these ow many recruits he's going to get but i find it interesting that he may now feel it necessary to seek civilian reinforcements. >> reporter: turning nowo the libyan capital, we're joined by cnn senior correspondent nick robertn who is in tripoli. hi, nick. libyan officials, we understand, took you to eastern tripoli today and showed you theon effes of the coalition bombing campaign. what did you see when you were on the outskirts of the city? >> reporter: well, they wanted to show us civilian casualties which they weren't able to. sho us. they took to us a farm that appeared, part of the farmland area had been struck by a missile. we couldn't tell where the missile had come from or even who had fired it. what we saw when
. phoenix, arizona on our line for republicans. what should the president say on the u.s. involvement in libya on monday? caller: if he's the intelligent president i want him to tell us why we're going into libya and not the sudan and not bahrain. i think it's un:tionable to open another front when we're spending millions a day on iraq and afghanistan and 50% of our revenue goes to defense. host: the sudan would be another front, too. caller: we could help solve that with humanitarian aid. with the cost in fossil fuels, if we paid the actual cost that fossil fuels cost us, we would pay $12.50 a gallon for gasoline because these wars are about oil. what i'm saying is if he's the innocent president then why doesn't he talk about -- intelligent president why doesn't he talk about the bahrain or sudan? he's doing it for oil just like the last -- just like the iraq war. and i think we need to question why we're doing these things. if we want to help people resisting and trying for democracy, let's do that. but let's not be hidden about our agenda.
of that u.s. fighter jet and we are happy to report both crew members are safe and in u.s. hands. we are covering the angles from the points on the map. nic robertson in tripoli and chris lawrence at the pentagon and retired navy captain alec frazier is here at the cnn center. chris, what is the pentagon saying about this? >> reporter: well, they are saying, bottom line, carol, is that both of these crew members are now off libyan soil and safely back in u.s. hands, but the story of how they got there, is just fascinating. this crew took off from a base in italy overnight and they were on a strike mission. in other words, they weren't necessarily just patrolling. this was a fighter jet specifically designed to go after some of moammar gadhafi's air defense systems. overnight at some point, the military plane got into some mechanical problems and both of the crew members ejected. their chutes worked just fine but they landed in different places. the pilot was picked up by an osprey. that was sitting off the coast about a hundred miles on the "uss kearsarge." the marines, the 26 marine
for the u.s., the intel community, works very hard to provide the administration, whatever administration is, with the best information possible and available at that moment. whoever has the best information likely is going to make the best decisions in the best interest of the u.s., which is not to engage in war overseas. there is a tendency to think that is what we're doing, that are warmongers. the real world is, unfortunately, more difficult. i would argue that thegency, you know, is a tool used by any administration to enhance transparency, to minimize the risk that people face overseas, that the government faces overseas. then again people will be watching this. ey will think hey that mike baker is pretty subjective. hostmimike baker a >> president obama is speaking about libya later today from national defense university. ahead of the speech, the associated press wrote that the white house made it clear that it was not a precedent for involvement in other nations that hold strategic interests for the u.s.. we will have the president's speech live at 7:30 eastern and we will take your
is a highly developed country. it is as technologically sophisticated as us, and there's much concern in the u.s. that a similar accident can occur here. how do you respond to that concern? >> well, first, i would agree with you. the reactor in chernobyl was of a different design. it was-- it had point of instability. it had no containment vessel. but we are looking very carefully at what is naepg japan because, as you say, they're using more advanced designs. a number of reactors in the united states have similar designs, and we're going to look at what went wrong in terms of the double-barreled whammy this huge, hung earthquake and huge su, and look to our reactors again and learn as much as we can so we can, if needed, improve the safety. by "if needed" what i really mean is we're always increasing the safety of our reactors, and not only our reactors but the safety of all our industrial systems. >> mr. secretary, two days ago a number of us wrote to chairman upton, whitfield, and stearns, asking our committee here investigate and hold hearings about the safety and prepared understandness of
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
we think this is going to be? can they make up for these losses? >> u.s. investors are rattled. coach shares are down 8%, but if you look at the long-term outlook, it looks a little better for these retailers. it's going to take a few months, but japanese contention there will eventually rebound, and what they're doing right now is pushing hard into china trying to grow their businesses. also here in the u.s., we see the demand for luxury goods improving that's rebounding with the economic recovery here in the u.s. suzanne? >> all right, allison, thank you. appreciate it. >>> we want to go beyond the headlines now on the recovery of those two airmen after their fighter jet crashed in libya. we're learning more about how the chain of events played out. u.n. forces rescued the pilot and libyans found the weapons officer. >> i am speaking with him and i kiss him and i tell him you are coming for us. you are our brothers. so don't be afraid. you will be safe. we will carry you anyplace you want. >> for more details on the crash and the recovery, i want to bring in our pentagon corresponde
, click on it. suddenly large crowds were denouncing their president hosni mubarak. the u.s. was in the awkward position of supporting the pro-democracy demonstrators without alienating a longtime ally. after weeks of bloody confrontations and a tense vigil in tahrir square longtime president mubarak abruptly stepped down. now we go to libya. right here in the middle again. click on it. gives you all the latest developments and everything you need to know. libya has become the focal of this historic movement. rebels swept into dozens of key cities until moammar gadhafi unleashed military forces on his own people and that prompted nato to get involved leveling the field with strategic air strikes. this fever has now spread to syria. again, all of the information on cnn.com. bahrain, of course, on the map here and also in yemen, as well. anything can happen. john? >> and, don, two really important questions coming out of all of this. what's going to happen next, and why is this happening? mohammed jamjoon is live in our bureau there in abu dhabi to answer some of these questio
. that is according to an american admiral, the commander off the u.s. naval forces in europe and africa who said today, quote, we will continue to make him comply. it's also just a couple of hours since a u.s. air force f-15 strike eagle jet went down in eastern libya with two u.s. air force officers on board. the official word from the pentagon today is that the plane experienced some sort of equipment malfunction. we do now know the two crew members ejected. they were recovered and they are now safe and out of libya. >>> i want to get right to the pentagon, get a little bit more on this with chris lawrence live for me there. chris, let's just back up. how was the crew rescued? where are these two members now, and how are they doing? >> well, first off, brooke, how are they doing, they're okay. they've gots minor injuries but that's to be expected when you consider they had to eject from their airplane. these two crew members had some sort of mechanical malfunction if n their f-15. they had to eject over eastern libya from the airplane. now, the ejeksz worked fine, the parachutes landed fine, b
to help out. the u.s.s. ronald reagan arrived off the coast on sunday and made dozens of trips delivering aid. meanwhile, more video is emerging of the sheer scale of what's hit japan. take a look at this. in a moment, we'll go live to japan. but, first, here is my take. there have been many ways to try to make sense of the tsunami in japan. many analogies from history. the simplest for me is if you take the earthquake that hit new zealand a few weeks ago and multiplied it by 1,000, would you get the one that hit japan. or if you remember the one that devastated haiti last year? this one is several hundred times more powerful. that's why despite all of the precautions and preparedness, the devastation has been so great. in fact, most experts agree that in terms of safety plans and procedures, japan has done almost everything right. it's too soon to draw any important lessons here. too soon to do anything but mourn. but this tragedy does remind us, no matter how much advance work a country does. no matter how well the buildings are built, nothing can prepare you for this. but the work has
that the white house says nato will take greater command authority leading to more questions as to who u.s. troops respond to. is it the u.s. military or nato? the present will talk about this tomorrow. guest: this shows that there is a concern at the white house about congress and the broader american public if they understand the mission or support the mission. that will be an issue for the next few days for the white house to address this and obama to define what his ideas are and how he wants to get there. host: we have the aljazeera washington chief and we have the reporter for "the washington post." good morning. caller: i am curious -- does any of this have to do with the arab countries and the turmoil? the issue that nobody wants to talk about has to be there. it has to be included in cnn. it is the country of israel. we have to get the shield away and not be able -- afraid to talk about the issues of israel and the palestinians. host: we will put that issue on the table right now. thank you. guest: the viewer raises a very important point. israel has as we all know, for several de
than gaddafi. host: we will he coverage of the president's speech to the nation of the u.s. involvement in libya coming from the national defense university. live cerage at 7:30 p.m. eastern time, 4:30 p.m. on the west coast. for more details, go to our web span.org.uesc- next caller. caller: mike x brother in law as a retired navy cmdr. winners in this latest war is a military industrial complex. mike, you are a good spokesperson for t work complex. is there ever a program of conflict resolution? what if all of the people working for him on conflict resolution -- we have all of these people and putting troop on the ground. where is conflict resolution in this scenario? guest: i would argue that there has been a concerted effort to avoid escalating this problem in libya. we saw that early on when there was a great deal of complaining about the fact that we were not getting involved sooner. during the course of that, there was this conflict resolution effort. the problem is there was a drum beatrom both extremes sides. there was a call for a no-fly zone. some wanted to go out there immed
. >> of the united nations representative for afghanistan said the u.s.-led surge in the country is working. he spoke and the middle east institute in washington as the u.s. voted to extend its mission by one year. this is 55 minutes. >> he has come from new york where he was talking about afghanistan. i believe the security council is voting today. is that correct? on thursday, he was talking about the u.s. role in afghanistan and its camilla -- commitment to the development of the country. the u.n. plays an important role. there are 34 representatives in afghan provinces. they spent over $1 billion on the country last year. food programs, health services, and infrastructure and development. the afghans are asking to take a greater lead in all aspects of government and development and the efforts to achieve peace. staffan de mistura made it clear that the u.n. takes these calls for sovereignty. seriously. what are the challenges of handing over greater responsibility to the afghan government? how can the u.n. support the process and maintain its commitment to the development of afghanistan? these qu
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
university. the actions the u.s. has taken. the transition to nato command. monday at 7:30 eastern. c-span and c-span radio. >> i am not interested in developing a strategy to win the primary and not winning the general. we have done well everywhere. >> rick santorum sits down to discuss a presidential bid in 2012. on c-span. >> as protest continue, and as nato sets to take control find the latest from the administration officials . all searchable on your computer. watch what you want, when yo u want. >> a look between the relations between the u.s. and libya. this is about 45 minutes. van is a securities studies adjufpkt professor at georgetown university and joins us to talk about the relations between the united states and libya both on diplomat and military fronts. take us through the evolution of the relationship between u.s. and libya say from the mid 60s up through the present. guest: i think it's important to start earlier than that if we look back at the time period when it wasn't libya yet it was actually part of the otoman empire. and if you listen to the
. clearly they need help but u.s. defense secretary says countries other than the u.s. can step in with training. robert gates is on capitol hill amid new revelations of cia people gathering facts and cultivating contacts on the battlefield. here's a bit of what he told the house arms services committee. >> i can't speak to any cia activities but i will tell you that the president has been quite clear that in terms of the united states military, there will be no boots on the ground. >> now i want to show you a libyan city that's far from rebel territory but a battleground in every sense. misrata, which we've already mentioned there in yellow. almost from the start of this uprising, misrata has been under siege from government tank, artillery, even snipers. an independent reporting has been all but impossible in fact we don't even know who controls misrata anywhere but cnn's frederik pleitgen managed to enter the city yesterday and when he found, well you will have to see from yourself. fred, joins us from a ship not far from the misrata port. fred, tell us about your odyssey the
to libya, gene cretz talking to the opposition chief. >> >> a u.s. officials confirmed the authenticity of the call, but would not comment on the query about weapons. hillary clinton is speaking to the opposition, too. >> we are reaching out to the opposition inside and outside of libya. i will be meeting with some of those figures both here in the united states and when i travel next week to discuss what more the united states and others can do. >> reporter: but moammar gadhafi and is spokesman's son show no signs of caving into pressure. >> the libyan peet will never, ever welcome nato, will never, ever welcome americans here. libya is not a piece of cake. we are n-- >> this is a kind of stalemate back and forth, but i think longer term, that the regime will prevail. >> jill dougherty reporting for us from the state department. we'll have a lot more on what general clapper, head of the national -- director of national intelligence had to say. this note, though, i have been invited to travel with secretary clinton on her overseas trip next week. i'll be reporting on critical talks abou
likely have to put u.s. troops on the ground to accomplish that mission, or risk killing many civilians from the air. the danger posed to our men and women in uniform would be far greater. so would the cost and our share of the responsibility for what comes next. to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. thanks to the extraordinary sacrifices of our troops and the determination of our diplomats, we are hopeful about iraq and their future, but regime change there took eight years, thousands of american and iraqi lives, and nearly a trillion dollars. that is not something we can afford to repeat in libya. as the bulk of our military effort ratchets down, what we can do, and we will do, is support the aspirations of the libyan people. we have intervened to stop the massacre, and we will work with our allies and partners to maintain the safety of civilians. we will deny the regime arms, cut off its supplies of cash, assist the opposition, and work with other nations to hasten the day when gaddafi leaves power. it may not happen overnight. a badly weakened gaddafi is trying desperately to
on that later in the hour. now libya, though. the top commander of the u.s. military operation in libya says nato has agreed in principle to not only take over the no-fly zone, but also the broader mission of protecting civilians. he said it's all going to happen very soon. here's what general carter hamm said today on "the situation room." >> we expect that nato will take over the no-fly zone this weekend, and then the next piece, the third and final piece, is the mission to protect civilians. nato, it's my understanding that nato has agreed to that in principle and will this command decide on the procedures and timing of accepting that mission. but i think that will probably occur in the very near future. >> ham also said that removing moammar gadhafi from power by military means is not the aim of the mission and the coalition isn't arming the opposition. but the coalition strikes on gadhafi's mechanism of power continue. authorities say coalition fighter planes took out seven libyan tanks in 24 hours. in fact, we got this video from the british ministry of defense showing british aircraft
've often occurred in japan/u.s. relations, the taken for granted ally, slowly slip and not find its way forward. there's a dark side to this. in japan, when things haven't gone well, when you saw leader after leader, after leader as we've seen in japan's political cycles. unable to deal with the challenges at hand. you see a dark nationalism that grows, because of both a frustration that japan isn't hitting its mark and at the same time a frustration that the -- the paralysis that has dmom natured the political system is keeping japan from being the kind of nation it is. and there is a minority that takes this to the extreme. this could take us in dramatically different directions. >> and, briefly, are you optimistic that this could be the shock to the system that produces some action? >> it does bring out a lot of solidarity among the people and also basically to the political system to see that opposition doesn't exist. this is almost like when the terrorist attack hit the united states. we can put politics aside for a moment. very difficult to transform the structural side of the jap
on the ground were the clearest indication that intensive air strikes carried out by the u.s., french and naval assets over the past week have softened up the libyan military considerably. meanwhile, the front page of " the new york times" - below the fold in the new york times, there's a story on the event recovered live on c-span yesterday. this is prompting us to ask republicans to define what will define the gop primary. with that, republicans only -- 202 the area code. our first call is from ardmore, oklahoma. caller: good morning. i believe the people of united states, their first concern is the economy. another thing we have to be concerned about is full disclosure. in this administration under obama, there has never been such hit in things. he spends money like going to brazil and giving out this money. they owe us tons of money. under the clinton years clinton lent them $100 billion. it goes on and on and on. when did congress lose the power of the purse? the other thing which is the greatest thing in our nation is we have to come back to god and of this nation repents if my people cal
taking place there, then briefings that took place earlier today with the u.s. ambassador to libya. and white house press secretary carney announced that president obama will deliver a speech soon on libya and the region. and finally, more from french president sarkozy. but first, today's vote in the canadian house of commons, opposition members toppled prime minister stephen harper 166-145. we'll show you the vote and the comments of the prime minister and opposition leader, it's about an hour and a half. >> you're looking at a live shot on parliament hill. everyone on the inside is not as stately and calm as it is on the inside. they're waiting for a historic nonconfidence vote on an issue of contempt. that will make history. you're watching a special live edition of showdown in parliament. i want to welcome our viewers on the main network in saskatchewan and alberta. welcome to this unfolding story about our country and as we head toward an election, it will all hinge on what you're about to see in the matter of minutes ahead. we're waiting for the speaker of the house, peter mi
. they were followed by more than 100 cruise missiles fired by u.s. and u.k. warships. the u.s. and britainan have fired 124 tom hack missiles at libyan air strikes. that was as of sunday night local team. a libyan army spokesman called for a immediate cease-fire, but the forces lining up against it don't seem inclined to respond to that. we want to get analysis on this with the professor of international relation tiz london school of economics. thank you very much for being with us. first of all, what is the situation -- let's talk a little bit about what the arab league has been doing right now. it's almost as if they're throwing a spanner in the works. are they? >> they're getting cold feet. you have seen in the last few days. while we accepted a no fly zone, but we have never said yes for massive bombing. for the potential of civilian casualties, for the escalation of the coalition golds. this is the reality. arab television, arab viewers now have been exposed to two days of bombings, and you can see -- >> but they knew they were getting into because the security council resolution 1973 s
the transfer to nato leadership by wednesday. the u.s. will turn over the reins. the coalition has 16 members of the data. we will show you those if you have not seen the list. let's take a call from deidre alabama, a democrat. >> i want to say kudos to president obama. he did what he needed to do. i feel as a democrat that a man with his intellect knows exactly what he is doing. i believe the american people should stand behind him and understand he is doing what he can to keep us safe and other countries save as well. >> what was the most powerful argument the president made tonight for your ears? >> he made so many good, valid points. as far as the no-fly zone, as far as i am concerned, like what happened with 9/11, i do not feel if president obama was president at the time that would have happened. what he is doing is heartfelt. he cares for all of these other countries. he cares for the american people. >> mike is in new haven ohio, an independent there. did the president make the case for you tonight? >> no, he did not. people better wake up. he starts a war, it takes off for brazil, an
from the u.s. military, we rule the airwaves, we have accomplished our military objective in terms of creating a no-fly zone but don't seem yet, and certainly it's only four days in, to be cracking gadhafi's will to fight back. and if the objective is to have him leave office, are we getting closer to that? >> i think our military objective so far have been much more limited. and in that sense, the narrow sense, they've succeeded masterfully. we have suppressed his anti-aircraft capacity. we've now captured the skies over libya. and we've beaten him back so that he's not been able to get into benghazi. those are the goals, we've succeeded. we have an extraordinary trained military, the best trained in all of history. we're up against a force of like 10,000 who have decrepit equipment. it's not surprising we would succeed. the hard part is still ahead, isn't it? we see no signs, as nic robertson suggested, we see no signs that there's a crack in the circle around him. that there's going to be an overthrow, a coup from within. that it appears he's going to fight on. and now we're beg
a further humanitarian emergency. >> of these were tomahawk cruise missiles launched from u.s. warships. some were fired on sunday from a british submarine. the u.s. government says the bombardment is working to destroy the libyan leader's command and control capabilities, without targeting him directly. >> at this particular point, i can guarantee he is not on a targeting list. >> is there a but to that? >> the rest of that is, if he happens to be in a place, if he is inspecting a surface to ailment -- surface-to-air missile site, we did not have an idea he is they're not. >> western powers have affected their sights on a range of libyan government targets across the coast. this is the result of around eastern city of benghazi. americans say troops are suffering from isolation and confusion, although benghazi and its defiant population are not yet free from threats. >> tripoli very much the target of last night bombardment. indeed, going to the heart of the gaddafi regime, although as you heard, the americans say although at the moment colonel gaddafi himself is not a target of the bom
making the case there's too much hungner the u.s. and it's government's responsibility to help. they're also making visits to capitol hill urging members of congress to find other areas to cut and continue food assistance to the poor. >> i know jim wallace. we were speaking at a hunger strike. we're going to talk to him tomorrow about what he's doing. jessica, thank you very much. >>> a lot of you have been tweeting me about the weather. you in florida, severe weather. slamming florida right now. take a look at the very colorful radar. we'll have pictures with the latest damage next. but first, want to go to stephanie elam with some freel money advice. >> time now for the help desk where we get answers to your financial questions. with me right now, donna rosato and lynn net cox is a writer. thank you for being with us. our first question from jeff in michigan. he writes i'm underwater on my home but no one will help me because i'm unemployed. i have paid my mortgage on time but told i could get help if i stop. what should i do? we hear this so often. >> it's never a good idea to sto
assault, assistance from the u.s. and other air forces. i am against it. i think, again, if the french and other allies feel they have a strategic interest in taking this battle on behalf of opposition all the way to tripoli, then let them land of the foreign legion in tripoli and let them take on this fight. this is what the french government wants. they have a greater stake in the outcome than we do come and they do not think the united states has a core strategic interests getting involved any more than the military has done so, despite the clamoring of the opposition. this is something that is really of no great consequence to the united states, and that our allies want to take on the responsibility for this fight, we should let them do so. host: let's conclude with this question. what do you think will happen in libya, and if or when he leaves, who is his successor? guest: unless he continues to get hammered by other air forces, other than ourselves, he will continue to hold on. there is some hope on the part of the secretary of defense gates that there would be divisions within h
>>> i'm fionnuala sweeney at cnn center. u.s., british and french forces are hammering key libyan installations under the code name "odyssey dawn." the pentagon says that so far, more than 100 u.s. and british tomahawk cruise missiles have struck libyan targets, primarily air defense systems. a no-fly zone was approved by a u.n. security down she will. colonel gadhafi and his forces have been responding by targeting the skies with anti-aircraft fire. 20 air and missile defense targets have been attacked in western portions of the country. washington says the coalition mission is aimed at keeping colonel gadhafi's regime from using force against its own people. late word is that fighter jets were seen today flying over the libyan city of benghazi. it's unclear who those fighter jets belong to. france's fighter jets are currently enforcing the no-fly zone. the "de gaulle" aircraft carrier leaves its port sunday. a refueling tanker is on standby. the uk is deploying typhoon patrol jets. all-weather attack aircraft and air to air refuelling and surveillance planes. the u.s. will not d
session of the u.s. congress. and i said that the single greatest threat facing the world and my own country was the arming of iran with nuclear weapons. and since then what i've been trying to do is to alert the world and the leaders of the world that it's not merely our problem, that it's their problem because iran today is -- in afghanistan, it's in iraq, it's gotten control of lebanon. it's gotten control of half the palestinian society -- >> do they have weapons, do you think? >> it's working to get them. >> how close do you think they are? >> i think they're getting a lot closer. >> should they be transparent about their nuclear program? >> even to the extent that they are transparent, it's very clear what they're doing. they're -- they've enriched enough material now almost for three nuclear bombs. they industrial to reenrich it again, but that's what they're doing. they -- they're building long-range cbcs, icbms, they don't need to do that. >> what about the country that is arming itself to the teeth, possibly getting nuclear weapons, and you're its number-one target. what ar
called the u.s. memory championship which involves memorizing all sorts of crazy stuff and ended up winning which really wasn't supposed to happen. >> so you put this training to use as you say winning this competition, so what were the things that they asked you to memori memorize? what were the crazy things? >> there are several events in one of these contests, one of them is memorizing a poem, one is memorizing a whole bunch of random numbers, one of my favorite events, five strangers get up on strange and essentially reel off all of this biographical information, their names, phone numbers, the names of their pets, what kind of food they like and you've got to recall as much of that as possible. >> what are the techniques that you studied? what are the tricks you were able to use to expand the use of your brain and your memory? >> it turns out there is a whole host of techniques invented 2,500 years ago in sane shent greece, same medieval scholars used to memorize entirely books which have been kind of forgotten about except they are used by the "mental athletes" to compete in t
that the majority of the u.s. segment was brought up a piece by piece. it will be truly amazing. >> congratulations on a successful mission. the question will be for someone who wants to tackle it. i do not think people on the ground can appreciate what the living spaces are like in the space station. now that it is complete can you talk a little bit about how large it is and how much space you had to move around in? >> just to start off, this space station is the largest pressurized volume in place in history -- in space in the history. i use the word that my son uses, which isginormous -- is g inormous. it is equivalent to a seventh 47 or bigger. it is oppressive -- a 747 or better. we can use every single one of the walls or models in a way that we cannot do on the ground. it makes for a wonderful resource for science and living and being up here floating around. it is great. >> i have a question about garbage, literally. how much trash does the iss generate? where do you put it and do you recycle? >> we do recycle certain things. we recycle our water and -- our urine and turned it into water. t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)